CultOurvators

CroSs-cultural coMmunity PlaNnING, Curation & Permacultural Guidance in the Eastern Woodlands.

P.215.971.5354
E.cultOurvators@gmail.com
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Spruce Street Harbor Park 

University Research on Woody Perennial Polycultures with Kevin Wolz of The Savanna Institute | 

"A Woody Perennial Polycultures (WPP) is an assemblage of plant species that aims to mimic the structure and function of natural ecosystems to sustainably produce an agricultural yield while simultaneously restoring ecosystem services. Rather than perpetuating the separation of nature and humans, this system attempts to break down the dichotomy between ecological restoration and agriculture. This concept has grown and evolved out of fields such as agroecology, agroforestry, permaculture, silvopasture, carbon farming, and ecological restoration, but the application of this paradigm to large-scale industrial agriculture is a relatively new idea. "

Jonathan Rosen: Why the Passenger Pigeon Became Extinct 

We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole

- Henri Cartier Bresson

Lensblr Quote of the Day

(via lensblr-network)

Chicago Tribune - Native American rapper looks to break stereotypes 

The Oldest Living Things in the WorldTrailer 

Open Source Seed Initiative | "Free the Seed!" 

Novel Open Source Seed Pledge aims to keep new vegetable and grain varieties free for all 

"This week, scientists, farmers and sustainable food systems advocates will gather on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus to celebrate an unusual group of honored guests: 29 new varieties of broccoli, celery, kale, quinoa and other vegetables and grains that are being publicly released using a novel form of ownership agreement known as the Open Source Seed Pledge.

The pledge, which was developed through a UW-Madison-led effort known as the Open Source Seed Initiative, is designed to keep the new seeds free for all people to grow, breed and share for perpetuity, with the goal of protecting the plants from patents and other restrictions down the line.

"These vegetables are part of our common cultural heritage, and our goal is to make sure these seeds remain in the public domain for people to use in the future," says UW-Madison horticulture professor and plant breeder Irwin Goldman, who helped write the pledge."

Biodiversity Survives Extinctions For Now - Scientific American 

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Bumblebee Wolf" (Philanthus bicinctus)
…a species of solitary Crabronid wasp that is native to the central United States. Like its European cousin P. bicinctus, despite its common name is a simple herbivore and feeds on pollen and nectar. Only female bumblebee wolves will track down bees, specifically bumblebees (Bombus spp.), and paralyze them. Once the bee is paralyzed the female will place it underground with one of her eggs. With the bee’s fate becoming food for the wasp’s larva once it hatches. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hymenoptera-Apoidea-Crabronidae-Philanthinae-Philanthini-Philanthus-P. bicinctus
Image: ©Hartmut Wisch

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Bumblebee Wolf" (Philanthus bicinctus)

…a species of solitary Crabronid wasp that is native to the central United States. Like its European cousin P. bicinctus, despite its common name is a simple herbivore and feeds on pollen and nectar. Only female bumblebee wolves will track down bees, specifically bumblebees (Bombus spp.), and paralyze them. Once the bee is paralyzed the female will place it underground with one of her eggs. With the bee’s fate becoming food for the wasp’s larva once it hatches. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hymenoptera-Apoidea-Crabronidae-Philanthinae-Philanthini-Philanthus-P. bicinctus

Image: ©Hartmut Wisch

wasbella102:

Benjamin Chee Chee’s birds

wasbella102:

Benjamin Chee Chee’s birds

(Source: generic-art)

Les Moyens d’Existence, 1969. René Magritte. Color etching on Japon nacré

(Source: kafkasapartment)

ornithoscelidaphiliac:

thelynxandthejackalope:

He did a good job.

(she)

also my drawing has over 1300 notes!

beekinder:

Why use smoke to control/calm bees?

I rarely use a smoker or veil when working my girls. I know my bees, I listen to them and can tell by their buzz and flights if they accept my presence.

This is not the norm, if I encounter wild or swarm bees, if i am installing a nuc or queening, I always wear a veil and use a little sugar water to distract them.

So when is smoke necessary? I find the adage that bees think their home is on fire and load up with honey incase of a quick exit isn’t bee like. After all the queen can’t fly with them. Personally I think it disrupts the Queens powerful pheromones which controls the hives actions. Left to their own devices without direction and control they go into everyone for themselves mode.

Smoke also lingers (ever been in a house that had a fire), it can, and will disrupt the queen and its workers for days. Our visits are intrusive enough with breaking apart their hive and probing around. Don’t make the mistake of smoking them into a tizzy. 

If you must smoke. One or two puffs at the hives entrance. One puff under the top cover. Never smoke bees directly.

So learn how to light a smoker, I use pine leaves, wood shavings, burlap bags or bay leaves. Use a blow torch with an on/off switch.

1. You want a properly working smoker that will be ready for the duration of the inspection.

2. Always test the smoker on your skin to make sure its not too hot.

3. Smoke yourself, head, hair, arms, pant legs.

4. Set the smoker within reach in a safe area. where the smoke can blow your way. Nothing like a grass fire and angry bees.

5. Always choose sugar water sprays instead of smoke.

6. And if they are too aggressive don’t fight them. Close it up for another day.

You may smell like a BBQ but a least  you will have the respect of your bees and a lot less stings. 

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